Forty-eight

I had been toying with the idea of reflections on sunglasses. I wanted to change the reflection on a pair of sunglasses to seem more interesting. Sunday, my neighbor accidently presented me with the perfect photo to manipulate. It was a selfie that she had taken while in her car. It was mostly a very cool selfie but the reflection on her sunglasses gave away the reality of the photo. Car, dashboard, road. Boring. My neighbor loves the beach. So, I made the necessary changes. I'm not 100% with it. But, it's done.

📸 cred: my neighbor

📸 cred: my neighbor

299 The One About Sweaters

Weezer, apparently has several self titled albums. The one on the Rolling Stone list at number 299 is known as The Blue Album, released in 1994. If you’re not a super huge Weezer fan, this might be the album that has the only songs from Weezer you’ve heard of, “Undone - The Sweater Song” and “Buddy Holly,” which were the songs that brought Weezer commercial success. If you’re like me, then you didn’t know that Weezer is still a thing. Like, there was a new album last year and it looks like there is one coming this year. I’m not sure why this made the list. I don’t mean to suggest that it’s a bad album, it just doesn’t seem that great either. This is why I’m not a critic. Having just listened to it, the only thing that sticks in my mind is that Weezer looks just like Buddy Holly. Idk.

DGC, 1994

DGC, 1994

300 Is this the 4:20 anthem?

Well, looky looky! About a month shy of 2 years and I finally hit number 300. I scrolled through my journalling program and looked at the dates for when I wrote these posts. I wrote the rules on May 26, 2014 and within a month my mother was in the hospital and my world started to shift. There have been some long breaks in this project, mostly due to depressive episodes. I don’t currently feel a depression settling in, but I never do. I don’t really realize it’s happening until I start to match my couch or all of a sudden I have a good day. Anyhoo, that’s what is going on today. Let’s get on to Black Sabbath. Fitting, yes?

I can’t say that I’ve been much of a Black Sabbath fan, ever. I mean, I don’t hate them or anything. They’ve just always been that thing that Ozzy did before Ozzy did Ozzy. They are supposed to be the “pioneers of heavy metal” and, sure, I guess. Doesn’t mean I have to care about them. Right? Anyway, Master of Reality dropped in July 10971, and was Sabbath’s third studio album. Wiki tells me that it’s “regarded as the foundation of doom metal, stoner rock, and sludge metal.” What’s sludge metal? I dunno, Wiki had a link to explain sludge metal but I came away from that still not knowing. Master of Reality was Black Sabbath’s first top 10 album in the US and the only one for some 40ish years until they dropped 13 in 2013.

I listened to this on an evening jaunt around the neighborhood and I can’t say that I remember much about it. I think there was one song on it that I had heard but didn’t know it was Sabbath. And, now that I’m looking at the track listing, I have know idea which song that was. Yup, left that big of an impression. I dunno. I guess I’m a bad metal fan.

301 Dolly's Mom Stole Her Man

Dolly Parton has an amazing voice. I never saw Dolly Parton perform, I rebelled against country music after a Hank Jr. concert, but I imagine she puts on one hell of a show. Coat of Many Colors is Dolly’s eighth studio album from 1971. Apparently, some of the songs on this album also appear on other albums. I listened to it while I was out of my evening stroll around the neighborhood and only the first two songs stood out for me (the title song and "Traveling Man"). The rest of it I found just kinda meh.

RCA Victor, 1971

RCA Victor, 1971

302 Public Enemy is not a Joke

I was in high school when Public Enemy dropped Fear of a Black Planet (1990). I didn’t get it. I still don’t but it’s not for me. Other than the big clocks and jokes about 911, the big thing I remember about Public Enemy is the claim that it wasn't music. Well, it wasn’t just Public Enemy. Hip hop in general was not considered music. I don’t remember if Public Enemy was considered “gangsta rap.” I’ve grown uncomfortable with the phrase “gangsta rap.” Now it just seems like some derogatory thing to say about music that wasn’t understood by white people. I never listened to the entire album back in the ‘90s. I only saw the videos on MTV. I’m sure I toed the line when I was a kid. I’m sorry for that. Not only because I realize I was wrong but also because it’s takin me this long to hear some good music. I still don’t get it but it’s still not for me. And it’s a glimpse into something that I can try to understand. Give it a listen.

303 All Along the Original Watchtower

Sometimes, the original is just horrible. Bob Dylan is a great poet, but his version (the original) of “All Along the Watchtower” is horrible. I don’t like very many of Bob Dylan’s songs. Well, I don’t like listening to Bob Dylan sing most of his songs. John Wesley Harding is the eighth studio album from Dylan, released in 1967. It’s an acoustic album, which is cool. This album is home to “All Along the Watchtower.” The most popular version of “All Along the Watchtower” came the very next year from Jimi Hendrix. It is a much, much better version. Overall, Dylan’s singing voice aside, I didn’t hate this album. If you like Dylan and his voice doesn’t grate on your ears, you’ll probably like it.

Columbia, 19667

Columbia, 19667

304 The fourth, the fifth, the minor fall and the major lift

Jeff Buckley version of Leonard Cohen’s “Hallelujah” is the best. THE. BEST. And you can find it on the 1994 album Grace. This was Jeff Buckley’s only studio album. Unfortunately, Buckley died in 1997 while working on his second album. Looks like Grace was not well received when released but has moved up in both critical and commercial success ever since. It took me a long time to get through this album. I can’t seem to listen to “Hallelujah” only once. Honestly, the rest of the album didn’t really resonate with me. But, “Hallelujah” was on repeat for about 5 plays while I laid my yard under a full moon, cuddling with my chihuahua. Best. Night. Ever.

305 Gravel Roads and Triffids

I’m a bad human. I think most of us are but that’s a different post. No, I often mistake Lucinda Williams for Jacinda Barrett. Not because I think they look alike. I couldn’t identify Lucinda Williams if she was standing in front of me with a sign that says, “I’m Lucinda Williams.” I think it’s because I became aware of them around the same time and I knew who Jacinda Barrett was (most people my age might have seen her first on the London season of MTV’s The Real World).

Lucinda Williams is an American folk, blues, country singer/songwriter. Car Wheels on a Country Road (1998) is her fifth studio album. It won a Grammy for Best Contemporary Folk Album. I’ve read that it’s been her best selling album. I listened to it while pulling what I can only imagine were baby triffids from an isolated section of my yard. I don’t know which I liked better pulling the weeds or the album. There were folksy depressing parts that made me feel kinda shitty for killing the triffids. There were parts that made me rip them from the ground with glee. There were parts that felt too much like country music and I wanted to move on to Jeff Buckley.

I think the biggest thing I got out of this is that I now know the difference between Lucinda Williams and Jacinda Barrett. Also, the triffids are gone, for now.

Mercury, 1998

Mercury, 1998

Forty-seven

I hate my bank account. So, I rented a Canon 5D Mark IV. Day 1 is, of course, my dog and flowers from the yard. Jasmine this time.

306 2 Turntables & a Microphone

Last year, Beck won some kind of big Grammy, album of the year I think, and the world learned that Beck was still being Beck. Well, maybe not the world. I’m sure there are lots of people out there that are aware of what Beck is doing these days. I think of three things when conversation turns to Beck: 1. Jeff Buckley; 2. I’mma loser; 3. Devils Haircut. I usually forget about the two turntables and a microphone. Okay, I don’t actually think of Jeff Buckley. I do think of the song ‘Hallelujah,’ which for some reason I associate with Jeff Beck, when Jeff Buckley is actually the musician for the version that I like best.

None of this has anything to do with Odelay, which is either the second of fifth album by Beck released in 1996. Beck is not a loser on this album. Odelay is home to “Where it’s At” and “Devils Haircut.” It is also Beck’s most successful record, at least in the sales department. I didn’t really like it. He’s mostly experimental in a wtf did I just listen to kind of way. I don’t get it and I’m okay with that.

DGC, 1996

DGC, 1996

307 The Beatles, Again

I don’t know if I’ve mentioned it, but I’m not the biggest fan of the Beatles. I have no problem changing the channel if they pop up on the radio. Of course, I’m not sure why the Beatles would be on any radio station I normally listen to. That being said, I enjoyed A Hard Day’s Night. It’s the third studio album from the Beatles released in 1964. Part of the album is songs from the soundtrack to the Beatles film of the same name. The original UK album and US album were released about 2 weeks apart and have different track listings. I have know idea if that is still the case and I don’t know which one I listened to. But it was fun. And you should listen to it.

Parlophone, 1964

Parlophone, 1964

308 Swingin' Lovers

Shouldn’t there be more Frank Sinatra on this list? Seems like there should be more Sinatra. Maybe there’s more coming. Songs for Swingin’ Lovers is the tenth studio Sinatra album released in March 1956. It’s full of a bunch of upbeat Sinatra tunes. No power ballads here. Just fun Sinatra. Not that I’m gonna download it but if you’re looking a fun Sinatra album, start with this one.

Capitol, 1956

Capitol, 1956

309 Texarkana is not in Louisiana

Whole lotta really good Creedence goin’ on here.

Willy and the Poor Boys is the fourth studio album by Creedence Clearwater Revival released in 1969. This is the one you want if you want “Down on the Corner,” “Cotton Fields,” “Fortunate Son,” and “The Midnight Special,” all on one album. All favorite songs for me, “Cotton Fields” a little higher than the rest. But it gave me pause this time through. I don’t know why but it occurred to me that CCR probably didn’t write this song. So, I looked it up and sure enough, it’s a cover. The song was written by American blues artist Huddie Ledbetter, better known as Lead Belly. He first recorded it in 1940. There have been many covers of the song by quite a few artist, including The Beach Boys. About the only thing of note I could find about the lyrics for the song is the “down in Louisiana, just 10 miles from Texarkana” part. CCR changed this to “down in Louisiana, just about a mile from Texarkana.” Both versions make it obvious that neither artist is familiar with the area. Texarkana is about 30 miles north of the Arkansas-Louisiana border. I was hoping for more info about the song, but didn’t really have time to look into it. It’s that one song that always causes me to burst into song. While, Led Belly didn’t write “Midnight Special,” he did record a cover of it in 1934. It’s one of those traditional folk songs with an unknown origin. It was first recorded in 1905 by Howard Odum. Everything else on the album was written by John Fogerty.

I might have to have a Lead Belly day soon.

Forty-three

People seem to think that the camera matters. They don't wanna start projects because they don't have the gear they think they need. Don't worry about what gear someone else uses. Start with what you have. This photo was taken on my iPhone with the damn Snapchat app, then cropped in the Apple Photo app. Just start.